PET/CT | Nuclear Medicine - Clinics - Kent Health Group | +90 850 222 53 68
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PET/CT

Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a nuclear medicine functional imaging technique that is used to observe metabolic processes in the body as an aid to the diagnosis of disease. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide, most commonly fluorine-18, which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule called a radioactive tracer. Three-dimensional images of tracer concentration within the body are then constructed by computer analysis. In modern PET/CT scanners, three-dimensional imaging is often accomplished with the aid of a CT x-ray scan performed on the patient during the same session, in the same machine.


PET scanning with the tracer fluorine-18 (F-18) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), called FDG-PET, is widely used in clinical oncology. PET is also an important imaging tool in some neurological and cardiological diseases.


Oncology:

Cancer cells show up as bright spots on PET scans because they have a higher metabolic rate than do normal cells. PET scans may be useful in:

  • Detecting cancer
  • Revealing whether your cancer has spread
  • Checking whether a cancer treatment is working
  • Finding a cancer recurrence


Heart disease:

PET scans can reveal areas of decreased blood flow in the heart. This information can help you and your doctor decide, for example, whether you might benefit from a procedure to open clogged heart arteries (angioplasty) or coronary artery bypass surgery.


Brain disorders:

PET scans can be used to evaluate certain brain disorders, such as tumors, Alzheimer's disease and seizures.